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  1. #16
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by 1100011CS View Post
    Also, she is very confused and unstable when she finally comes out of it. The first time she actually growled at me and started running away from me toward my kids. That was really scary. Is there anything we should do during or directly after the seizures?
    she*, sorry about that.

    Probably keep the kids away (just because they're probably scared, she's scared and she doesn't know what's going on - bad combination). Be calm and quietly talk to her - and during the seizure too, she should be able to hear you.

    How close is her "spot" to the outside? Like is there a basement or place further from the noise of a storm that she could be instead? I agree with others, the storm is probably getting her overexcited, but definitely see if the vet can find anything now that it's a recurring thing and not a one-off.


    Last edited by cowgirl836; 06-24-2013 at 10:53 AM.

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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Has anyone tried a thunder shirt (calming jacket for dogs). Just curious if that helps calm their nerves?



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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclonepride View Post
    Has anyone tried a thunder shirt (calming jacket for dogs). Just curious if that helps calm their nerves?
    I've seen these at the vet and wondered about them too. This dog is also borderline gun shy so I wonder if they would help that too.



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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Couple of tidbits,

    First, sorry this is happening to you and your kids. We had a YLF that went through this for about 8 of her 11 years. Started when she was a puppy, put her on Phenobarb and they were controlled. The last couple years on it, she didn't have any so we took her off and she stayed seizure free for her last few years.

    Phenobarb is hard on dogs organs, specifically kidneys. And I think it may have also led to our YLF's cartiledge decay in her knee joints.

    During the seizures, we would hold her and talk to her. Previous poster is right, they can still hear you during the episode.

    Vet told us that each seizure affected the dog the same as a human running a marathon. Our YLF was extremely tired following her seizures and would not eat.

    All the best to you and your family as you go through this.



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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mkcrawford View Post
    Couple of tidbits,

    First, sorry this is happening to you and your kids. We had a YLF that went through this for about 8 of her 11 years. Started when she was a puppy, put her on Phenobarb and they were controlled. The last couple years on it, she didn't have any so we took her off and she stayed seizure free for her last few years.

    Phenobarb is hard on dogs organs, specifically kidneys. And I think it may have also led to our YLF's cartiledge decay in her knee joints.

    During the seizures, we would hold her and talk to her. Previous poster is right, they can still hear you during the episode.

    Vet told us that each seizure affected the dog the same as a human running a marathon. Our YLF was extremely tired following her seizures and would not eat.

    All the best to you and your family as you go through this.
    Thanks. My dog is extremely hungry following her episodes. She will eat in a few minutes what she would normally easy in a day.



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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    My dog had one the other day. Has one about once every 6 months.


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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    I'm so sorry that you and your family are going through this. The seizures are a nightmare to watch. We did learn with ours a couple of things that helped lessen the actual seizures. First, during the seizure keep it as quiet as possible. Turn off tv, radio, etc if you can. Talk to your dog in a quiet voice. You might want to try an ice pack when the seizure starts. Place the ice pack on the lower back. I don't know why it helps, but we felt it helped shorten how long they lasted and lessened defecation. We always had a folded towel ready to slip under the head since our dog shook so badly, banging his head hard on the floor. We learned to recognize the sign of when ours was going to have a seizure. His nose would wrinkle up like he had just smelled something very acidic for a few seconds before it began. Good luck.



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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by 1100011CS View Post
    Also, she is very confused and unstable when she finally comes out of it. The first time she actually growled at me and started running away from me toward my kids. That was really scary. Is there anything we should do during or directly after the seizures?
    The time after the seizure is called a post-ictal phase. The dogs can still seem disoriented or "out of it" during this time. This can last for several hours. Valium may help calm her down during that time. It is also good to just leave her alone and let her chill out for a bit as long as she is stable enough where she won't hurt herself. I would probably keep the kids away, esp. if they are young, during this time. She is confused at this time and could potentially react to them in an atypical manner.



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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    FWIW, I had a dog start having the same thing. Our Vet at the time was/is a popular Vet in DSM, said he probably had brain cancer and we should put him down. Took him to ISU for a 2nd and he had diabetes. Lived 4 more good years with shots twice a day. Our Vet had missed many signs of this. Just a head scratcher. Good luck!!!



  10. #25
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by isudoc03 View Post
    The time after the seizure is called a post-ictal phase. The dogs can still seem disoriented or "out of it" during this time. This can last for several hours. Valium may help calm her down during that time. It is also good to just leave her alone and let her chill out for a bit as long as she is stable enough where she won't hurt herself. I would probably keep the kids away, esp. if they are young, during this time. She is confused at this time and could potentially react to them in an atypical manner.
    That's basically what we've done the last two times. I also noticed during the last one that if I whistled she perked up.

    Just got a call from our vet. Didn't find anything in the bloodwork so he thinks she's starting to become epileptic(sp?). Does that make sense? Anyway, he gave us some natural supplements to try to reduce anxiety. If she continues to have them at this rate we'll try the phenobarbital.

    And of course right now it's lightening/thundering like crazy here:(



  11. #26
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Chitownclone2 View Post
    FWIW, I had a dog start having the same thing. Our Vet at the time was/is a popular Vet in DSM, said he probably had brain cancer and we should put him down. Took him to ISU for a 2nd and he had diabetes. Lived 4 more good years with shots twice a day. Our Vet had missed many signs of this. Just a head scratcher. Good luck!!!
    Hmm, didn't mention diabetes at all but I would assume the blood work would catch that. Right?



  12. #27
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by 1100011CS View Post
    That's basically what we've done the last two times. I also noticed during the last one that if I whistled she perked up.

    Just got a call from our vet. Didn't find anything in the bloodwork so he thinks she's starting to become epileptic(sp?). Does that make sense? Anyway, he gave us some natural supplements to try to reduce anxiety. If she continues to have them at this rate we'll try the phenobarbital.

    And of course right now it's lightening/thundering like crazy here:(
    That's good the bloodwork is ok. I probably would have started her on phenobarbital now but that is just a difference in opinion. How old is your dog?



  13. #28
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    I'm not sure how the ISU Vets tested for it, but it didn't take long. It was just frustrating the our old Vet missed the signs and rested on it being cancer and we should just put him down. Again, good luck with yours!



  14. #29
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Our dog took pills but started acting VERY differently so was taken off the pills. After, the seizures were much worse and we had to put her down. She was only 10 months.


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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    In 05 our 10ish yr old (came from a pound so didn't know exact age) German shepherd started seizing. The vet said she might just have one ... Or if she kept having them they'd get longer and more intense. The later happened. Her recovery time stretch from a few minutes to a day. She lost control of her bowels as the seizure drug on. She got to the point where she did not recover, as she did it appear to recognize us and was constantly agitated. It still brings tears to my eyes, thinking about those last days and then having to put her down. We were never told that medication might exist. From the first seizure to the end was maybe 6 weeks. Her seizures were not brought on by overexcitement. She was sleeping beside me when the first seizure occurred.

    I wish you Godspeed as you deal with this, but based on those with information on how they've been able to manage this, there might be hope.


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