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  1. #1
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    Baseball Pitching Question

    The Cubs are trying to get their hands on as many pitchers as they can. That's fine, but is seems like most of what I'm seeing are young pitchers with so so records that are hardly dominating. Is that a normal thing to see with pitchers? Does it take a few years to work the kinks out and all of sudden you can get a break out season where it all clicks?

    I understand the logic that it's a numbers game and the more arms you have, the better odds you have of getting a few good ones. Also pitchers are pretty good currency for trades down the road which the Cubs will certainly do.

    After years of watching the Cubs pay big bucks to bring in hot players, it's been interesting to see the change in philosophy. They are going after youth and potential now with less of a focus on dollars. I do think it's a good model long term.



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    Re: Baseball Pitching Question

    Young pitching is such a crap shoot. You never know when the light will come on or if it ever will. Sometimes, stocking up on as many good, young, CHEAP options works out because you may only spend as much as it would cost for one mid level starter and could potentially get a couple of stars out of it.

    Many organizations like to think that they can be the one to turn a guy with great stuff into a stud.



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    Re: Baseball Pitching Question

    I think they're taking bargain guys, signing them to one year deals and hoping they increase in trade value around the deadline. Then they'll dump em for prospects who they can lock up for longer terms.



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    Re: Baseball Pitching Question

    Plus, don't forget alot of these guys are probably just "organizational guys" to fill out rosters in the minor leagues. One of my favorite off season pasttimes is watching all of the fans flip out over organiziational signings, perfect example, Felix Pie for the Pirates!



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  5. #5
    DistrictCyclone
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    Re: Baseball Pitching Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobber View Post
    The Cubs are trying to get their hands on as many pitchers as they can. That's fine, but is seems like most of what I'm seeing are young pitchers with so so records that are hardly dominating. Is that a normal thing to see with pitchers? Does it take a few years to work the kinks out and all of sudden you can get a break out season where it all clicks?

    I understand the logic that it's a numbers game and the more arms you have, the better odds you have of getting a few good ones. Also pitchers are pretty good currency for trades down the road which the Cubs will certainly do.

    After years of watching the Cubs pay big bucks to bring in hot players, it's been interesting to see the change in philosophy. They are going after youth and potential now with less of a focus on dollars. I do think it's a good model long term.
    It all depends; some pitchers are able to come up to the bigs quickly and dominate right away (Pedro Martinez, Stephen Strasburg), while some take a pretty long time to hit their stride (Randy Johnson, R.A. Dickey). On average, I'd say most pitchers take 2-3 seasons to get acclimated to major league hitting before "finding themselves". That said, many pitchers will have good or even Cy Young caliber years every now and then, but ones that are consistently good (Roger Clemens, Johan Santana without the injuries) are real gems.

    Theo's strategy is a good one; good pitching bests good hitting, always. The teams that have ruled the roost over the past several years and that are positioned well for the future are teams with young, powerful, deep rotations (Giants, Rays, Nationals, Rangers, Reds).



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