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    The Iowa is home

    The Iowa arrived in LA today. The museum will be open in a month. I heard somewhere that anyone from Iowa gets in free. This would be quite a stop. I've been on the Missouri in Hawai'i and it was amazing.
    USS Iowa reaches California, will become museum | The Des Moines Register | DesMoinesRegister.com



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    Re:The Iowa is home

    I'd love to see it some day. I saw the Yorktown across Charleston harbor, but didn't get the chance to take tour and I wish I had.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    Stood on the Missouri a few weeks ago myself. And for never having seen an ocean-going vessel before, standing there was incredible. Absolutely awesome. Now I just have to find a way to justify a trip to LA to stand on the flagship of her class...



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    Maybe we will go to the holiday bowl next year and then we will all have a reason.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    Quote Originally Posted by brownie View Post
    Stood on the Missouri a few weeks ago myself. And for never having seen an ocean-going vessel before, standing there was incredible. Absolutely awesome. Now I just have to find a way to justify a trip to LA to stand on the flagship of her class...
    I liked a lot about my trip to the Missouri at Pearl Harbor. One of the things that is really moving about that experience is that from the Missouri you can see the monument built over the Arizona. The Japaneese surrender occurred on the Missouri, so between those two ships in the harbor you are witnessing the beginning and the end of America's war with Japan in World War II.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    I toured the Wisconsin in Norfolk. Was pretty impressive.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    I have toured the North Carolina. It was the Battleship my grandfather was on in WWII. It is amazing how big those ships are.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    I've been fortunate enough to tour the Wisconsin and Missouri, they are remarkable ships. My father was on the Wisky back in the 1950s, so it was pretty cool when my brothers and I toured it together. I think it's pretty cool that the largest, baddest class of US battleships ever created is the IOWA class of battleships.


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    Re: The Iowa is home

    Toured the aircraft carrier Midway in San Diego -- That is impressive!!! While we were there two active carriers were in and out of port Reagan and Stennis. On our tour of the bay we got up close to the Stennis and it just towers over you.

    Touring the Iowa is on the bucket list.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    I've done the Missouri as well, those guns send shells the size of volkswagon beetles 5 miles .....goo


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    Re: The Iowa is home

    I've toured the USS North Carolina I don't know how many times. She is an Iowa-class battleship and looks very similar to the photo of the USS Iowa. These ships are awesome.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    Quote Originally Posted by colbycheese View Post
    I've toured the USS North Carolina I don't know how many times. She is an Iowa-class battleship and looks very similar to the photo of the USS Iowa. These ships are awesome.
    The four Iowa-class battleships are: USS Iowa (BB-61), USS New Jersey (BB-62), USS Missouri (BB-63), and USS Wisconsin (BB-64).

    I believe that the USS North Carolina (BB-55) was the class proceeding the Iowa-class.

    BTW, I toured the USS Iowa while it was being refurbished in Richmond, CA prior to being towed down to LA. It is in need of a LOT of work. Hopefully everyone who tours it will contribute toward the refurbishment.

    The USS Iowa is A BEAST! Awesome vessel.


    Last edited by XLK9; 05-31-2012 at 11:58 AM.
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    Re: The Iowa is home

    Quote Originally Posted by XLK9 View Post
    The four Iowa-class battleships are: USS Iowa (BB-61), USS New Jersey (BB-62), USS Missouri (BB-63), and USS Wisconsin (BB-64).

    I believe that the USS North Carolina (BB-55) was the class proceeding the Iowa-class.

    BTW, I toured the USS Iowa while it was being refurbished in Richmond, CA prior to being towed down to LA. It is in need of a LOT of work. Hopefully everyone who tours it will contribute toward the refurbishment.

    The USS Iowa is A BEAST! Awesome vessel.
    Oh, my bad. I guess I remembered incorrectly what one of the museum displays said. Here's what the Iowa-class wiki saysIowa class battleship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

    The Iowa-class battleships were a class of fast battleships ordered by the United States Navy in 1939 and 1940 to escort the Fast Carrier Task Forces which would operate in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Six were ordered during the course of World War II, but only four were completed in time to see service in the Pacific Theater. The last two had been laid down, but as a result of the postwar draw down of the armed forces they were canceled prior to completion and eventually scrapped. Like other third-generation American battleships, the Iowa class followed the design pattern set forth in the preceding North Carolina- and South Dakota-class battleships, which placed great emphasis on speed as well as on the secondary and anti-aircraft batteries.[7] The Iowa class ships were also the longest examples of their type ever built, although other battleships were built with wider beams and higher displacements.
    I didn't realize there was such a thing as the North Carolina class. There's a lot of similarities between the Iowa and the North Carolina though.



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    Re: The Iowa is home

    Quote Originally Posted by colbycheese View Post
    . . . I didn't realize there was such a thing as the North Carolina class. There's a lot of similarities between the Iowa and the North Carolina though.
    Important differences, too. Speed is one of them. The Iowas are the fastest battleships ever built (why some have called them super cruisers) and at 33 knots matched the speed of the newest carriers in WWII.

    The four Iowas were the premier close-in anti-aircraft fleet carrier protectors during the war (their long decks bristled with anti-air guns). Today, even though retired, they remain the only big warships in the world that can sail, at top speed, with the U.S.s big carriers in any sea state.

    (Iowa is 159 feet longer than North Carolina; Iowa's shaft horse power is 212,000, compared with North Carolina's 121,000 shp. . . .)

    Only the Iowa's carried 16-inch, 50 caliber naval rifles (elsewhere in the U.S. fleet, the largest guns were 16-inch, 45 caliber). As I understand it, the larger caliber meant more accuracy and shell speed. Again, as I understand it, Iowa's 2700 lb. armor piercing shells were a match, in destructive power, to those of the Yamato, the biggest battlewagon ever built, which carried 18-1 inch naval rifles and 3200 lb shells.

    The Yamatos (Musashi was the second ship) were rated at 27 knots. They had other disadvantages when compared with the Iowas. Proceedings, the magazine publication of the U.S. Naval Institute, carried an article, authored by two noted naval experts, that speculated on the outcome of an Iowa-Yamato slugfest. The two nearly crossed paths during the largest naval engagement in world history, the Battle of Leyte Gulf, October 1944.

    BTW, one reason the Iowa Class draws ooohs and aaahs from those who see them are their lean, graceful shapes, particularly their long swooping bows. Only the Iowas present this profile: USS Iowa - December 1944 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    The Iowa-Yamato story (unpublished):

    Speed vs. power. Elusiveness vs. size. Iowa vs. Yamato. It nearly came to pass.

    Japanese strategists foresaw an end game in which a colossal struggle between Empire and United States battleship fleets would determine the destiny of the two nations for decades to come. Believing correctly that the warships of the two-ocean U.S. Navy would not exceed size restrictions imposed by the 110-foot-wide, 1,050-foot-long Panama Canal locks, Japan built the biggest brawlers of all time, the 72,000 ton Yamato and sister ship Musashi.

    The U.S. Navy, long embracing heavy armor protection over speed in its capital ship-building programs, broke precedent and built a class of battleships that were only the second-largest ever built, but the fastest. The 58,000 ton Iowas were rated 33 knots to the Yamatos 27 knots.

    The Yamatos' main batteries were equipped with 18.1-inch-diameter, 45 caliber guns, the largest in naval history, firing a 3,200-pound armor-piercing (AP) shell. The Iowas countered with 16-inch, 50 caliber naval rifles, the finest ever developed by the United States and installed only on the Iowa Class. Though Iowa's AP shells weighed 2,700 pounds, at great distances the striking power was roughly equivalent to the Yamatos' big guns. The longer caliber of Iowa's naval rifles resulted in greater shell velocity and, pound-for-pound, greater penetrating capability.

    When the Iowas were returned to the U.S. fleet in the 1980s, "Proceedings," a professional magazine published by the U.S. Naval Institute, carried an article written by naval experts Thomas Hone and Norman Friedman ("Iowa vs. Yamato: The Ultimate Gunnery Duel"). The authors, in consultation with gunnery specialists, made an outcome assessment of a potential sea battle between the two largest naval heavyweight fighters ever.

    The morning of October 25, 1944, during a running series of engagements by many fleet units over several days collectively known as The Battle of Leyte Gulf, four Japanese battleships, including Yamato, sallied through San Bernardino Strait. Had not Adm. "Bull" Halsey been lured away from the Strait, Iowa, New Jersey and four other U.S. battleships would have been in blocking position.

    Among Hone and Friedman's considerations in their analysis were the two ships' gun range, rates of fire, and penetration of fall of shot; accuracy of firing; and the ability of each warship to resist the shells of the other (a quality in naval design circles known as an "immunity zone").

    Yamato, compared with Iowa, was lumbering and myopic. Iowa held a critical advantage in speed, allowing her to dictate the distance at which the two combatants would engage. The Japanese Navy had not developed radar shell fire control, giving Iowa a 10-fold advantage in this critical area, the authors estimated.

    Yamato, with her mammoth size, enjoyed superior armor, slightly superior gun range, and, with her 3,200 pound projectiles, "somewhat greater" striking power.

    Yet, ballistics data rating the penetrating power of the shells and an analysis of the two ships' armor protection systems reveals that at the maximum range of both guns, neither ship was immune from the other's gunfire.

    U.S. doctrine called for getting the first hits at the very longest distance possible.

    A key question was posed the authors, could Iowa's gunners hit Yamato over the horizon before she could return accurate fire? Yamato's immune zone was calculated to be 16 miles to 20 miles. (An immune zone is a measurement at which the fall of enemy shot on an angle of trajectory presumably would not lethally penetrate a ship's armored citadels. Immune zone calculations varied greatly from one part of a ship to another and involved complex calculations.)

    A smoke screen from the U.S. task force would have compounded Yamato's difficulty, since she was without radar that would allow her to maintain contact with targets.

    Iowa's battle tactics against Yamato, therefore - to borrow from boxer Muhammed Ali's famous self-described fighting style - would be to use her great speed to "float like a butterfly" and, utilizing her better gunfire control, "sting like a bee."

    The likely commanders in such a scenario must also be considered, and the authors do just that. Hone and Friedman were critical of the way Japanese Admiral Takeo Kurita handled his battleships in the battle off Samar, one of the four engagements composing the Battle for Leyte Gulf. The likely U.S. battle line commander, Adm. Willis A. Lee, Jr., was a top flight battleship warrior. Kurita, cautious and uncertain, doubtfully would have matched up well with Lee.

    Concluded the authors, "Lee was an ordnance specialist; he well understood the need to strike quickly in a surface battle, and at the greatest possible range. He knew that the 16-in./50 cal. gun, linked with radar fire control, gave his ships the chance to do so. Having looked closely at the available evidence, we believe that he would have maneuvered them so that they could have done precisely that."

    Interestingly, an Associated Press story filed that same month, October 1944, spoke of Iowa's gunnery capabilities, although Yamato's dimensions and performance capabilities were not fully known to the Allies at the time.

    "ABOARD THE U.S.S. IOWA AT SEA (Delayed) (AP) – They call this biggest battleship ever launched "Showboat," and for several days now her crew has been rehearsing tragedy for the Axis. . . .

    "The ship's armaments were designed to deal powerful offensive blows, and her chief firing tests were made by the 16-inchers against moving sea targets. . . .

    "After each shattering salvo, photo triangulation, aerial photographs, air spots and top spots were combined to determine accurately the fall of shot. But to reporters aboard the results were best described by a petty officer who muttered: 'Bingo!' and 'Holy smoke!' "

    Exceptional also was Iowa's "footwork."

    "Those ships handled beautifully," Iowa's skipper in the final days of the war, Capt. Charles Wellborn, Jr. (later vice admiral), said years later. "They handled like destroyers. They had lots of power and great flexibility. . . . Those ships were a joy to handle."

    On October 24, 1944, Musashi came under five heavy strikes from American carrier planes and sank from 17 bomb and 19 torpedoe hits. More than 1,000 of Musashi's 2,400-man crew was killed. Eighteen American aircraft were lost.

    Yamato on April 7, 1945, was attacked by a total of 380 U.S. carrier aircraft sorites in two waves. After being struck by seven bombs and 10 torpedos, Yamato's forward ammunition magazines blew up. The explosion's smoke plume rose more than 20,000 feet and was seen from 100 miles away. Some 2,500 of Yamato's crew of 2,700 were lost.


    Last edited by CyValley; 05-31-2012 at 01:43 PM.
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