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    The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Where the Roads End in Water: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising - Lisa M. Hamilton - Life - The Atlantic


    The problem is that it has not stopped. Unlike with a river flood, this water does not naturally recede after a week or a month. It has nowhere to go: The lakebed is the result of a glacier that melted roughly 10,000 years ago, and its only natural outlet is at 1,458 feet above sea level. Since August 1992, the lake has risen more than 29 feet. That would be a remarkable increase in nearly any body of water, but in the context of North Dakota's famously flat topography it is extraordinary; here, the rising lake spreads across the land like water spilled on a table. At the lake's current size, a one-foot rise consumes more than 15,000 acres of surrounding land. In 19 years it has grown from roughly 69 square miles to 285, an area about the size of Fort Worth, Texas.



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    You'd think they could channel it in some way....perhaps dig out a large man-made lake in an area that is the least useful?



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclonepride View Post
    You'd think they could channel it in some way....perhaps dig out a large man-made lake in an area that is the least useful?
    Channel it over to the Colorado River. They need the water pretty badly.


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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    I would think that since they are only 8 feet from the outlet the easy thing would be to get out a shovel and dig a trench. at least you could stop it from getting worse, and then they would have a river to fish in too.



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Quote Originally Posted by CyCloned View Post
    I would think that since they are only 8 feet from the outlet the easy thing would be to get out a shovel and dig a trench. at least you could stop it from getting worse, and then they would have a river to fish in too.


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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Quote Originally Posted by CyCloned View Post
    I would think that since they are only 8 feet from the outlet the easy thing would be to get out a shovel and dig a trench. at least you could stop it from getting worse, and then they would have a river to fish in too.
    Since the lake has no outlet, the water has a high levels of salinity and sulfates, which the people down stream on the Sheyenne and Red Rivers don't want, particularly Fargo (because of their drinking water system) and Canada.



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Quote Originally Posted by tman24 View Post
    Channel it over to the Colorado River. They need the water pretty badly.
    That would be one hellacious infrastructure project. Creating a new river from ND to the Colorado would be impressive, both in scope and cost.

    Eventually (probably long after we are dead) there will be water transmission lines connecting various areas in the country, to supply water to areas like the SW and SE that have water shortages, possibly from areas like the Midwest (which has a vast MO River acquifer). Regions of the country that have water shortages now will recquire alot of supplemental water 100 years from now, especially if population continues to increase as projected.



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Quote Originally Posted by tman24 View Post
    Channel it over to the Colorado River. They need the water pretty badly.
    Quote Originally Posted by CloneIce View Post
    That would be one hellacious infrastructure project. Creating a new river from ND to the Colorado would be impressive, both in scope and cost.

    Eventually (probably long after we are dead) there will be water transmission lines connecting various areas in the country, to supply water to areas like the SW and SE that have water shortages, possibly from areas like the Midwest (which has a vast MO River acquifer). Regions of the country that have water shortages now will recquire alot of supplemental water 100 years from now, especially if population continues to increase as projected.
    More of a hellacious infrastructure project than you realize. This lake is east of the Rocky Mountains, and the Colorado River is west of it. Essentially, you would be making this one lake be the one and only water source in North America that violates the Continental Divide. Not to mention it having to cross the Missouri River (and countless other rivers) at some point. Los Angeles might need the water, but cost wise it just probably isn't worth it.

    Quote Originally Posted by bawbie View Post
    Since the lake has no outlet, the water has a high levels of salinity and sulfates, which the people down stream on the Sheyenne and Red Rivers don't want, particularly Fargo (because of their drinking water system) and Canada.
    If the levels of salinity and sulfates is a problem because the lake has no outlet, wouldn't this only be a problem initially? I mean, you're creating an outlet for that lake, once you get the "crap" water out of that lake (however long that takes), wouldn't it then become a fresh water source?


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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Quote Originally Posted by CyCloned View Post
    I would think that since they are only 8 feet from the outlet the easy thing would be to get out a shovel and dig a trench. at least you could stop it from getting worse, and then they would have a river to fish in too.
    I think you have a conceptual error....



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Going there to fish in a month, been there before. It's pretty weird fishing around old farms and equipment swallowed up by the water. There are some political issues with the river outlet, especially with Canada not wanting some of the fish species. In a few years they won't have a choice.



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    There are lots of places in the Dakotas that this is happening. Lots of pothole lakes with no outlets that keep growing.

    IIRC hwy 12 around Waubay SD has been raised three or four times.

    Devils lake is by far the biggest so it gets the most pub but this is happening all over North and South Dakota, they don't call it the prairie pot hole region for nothing.

    I was watching an episode of Midwest Outdoors this winter that was ice fishing on Devils Lake (as I am an avid ice fisherman and want to take a trip on the perch express up there sometime) and the guides were saying it is getting difficult to find fish from year in and year out as depth changes on their key spots every year or two and they have to go out and basically find new break points etc to match their old hot spots that are now to deep to be effective.



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    Re: The Lake That Won't Stop Rising

    Quote Originally Posted by FarminCy View Post
    There are lots of places in the Dakotas that this is happening. Lots of pothole lakes with no outlets that keep growing.

    IIRC hwy 12 around Waubay SD has been raised three or four times.

    Devils lake is by far the biggest so it gets the most pub but this is happening all over North and South Dakota, they don't call it the prairie pot hole region for nothing.

    I was watching an episode of Midwest Outdoors this winter that was ice fishing on Devils Lake (as I am an avid ice fisherman and want to take a trip on the perch express up there sometime) and the guides were saying it is getting difficult to find fish from year in and year out as depth changes on their key spots every year or two and they have to go out and basically find new break points etc to match their old hot spots that are now to deep to be effective.
    This is what my brother saw up there 4 years ago while doing some work along a pipeline. The pipeline was basically piling rock on thier pumping locations and replumbing to make thing reach. A lot of there locations looked like gravel islands.

    Oh by the way, for everyone that thought I was serious about solving this problem with a shovel, , I thought it was obvious.



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