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Thread: Dog question

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    Dog question

    First off I would like to say that my wife and I have a 3 year old female puggle (she has more beagle characteristics in her than pug fwiw). Every time our daughter gets in her high chair to eat the dog seems to have a desire to try to dig the pieces of food she misses her mouth with out of her crotch. This has been going on since October, albeit not as bad. But now the weather is getting nicer and the kiddo is starting to wear shorts more and more and when the dog tries to get the food out she scratches her legs now.

    From the beginning when the dog started to do this we disciplined the her and still discipline (scold/kennel/tell her no) her but she continues to try to dig. My wife and I are started to get fed up with it.

    Any ideas from those that may have experienced this before. or just anybody with a nugget to share?



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    Re: Dog question

    Maybe that bitter apple spray stuff? The problem there is you need to spray it on your kid but the taste is horrible but harmless. Maybe if the dog tastes that a few times, it won't be interested??


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    Re: Dog question

    I would say that when your daughter is in the high chair you command her to sit and then scold her anytime she gets up or comes near the chair.

    The other thing you can do is just keep her in the kennel anytime your daughter is eating.



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    Re: Dog question

    Shock collars are magical. For many dogs you only have to use it once.



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    Re: Dog question

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonehomer View Post
    Shock collars are magical. For many dogs you only have to use it once.
    This is true. Our dog likes to jump on people. Put the shock collar on and she is an angel. I don't even turn it on anymore.


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    Re: Dog question

    Get a gentle leader and teach her to sit and she can't really say no if she is trained with it. Good obedience classes help. The kennel option is viable also, but a nice obedient dog is always a good thing. A general observation of mine is that people that have well behaved dogs also have well behaved kids. A good book for training hunting dogs is Gun Dog by Richard Wolter, but the same principles apply to all dogs and I know one guy that used it in continuing education classes for teachers in how to deal with kids.



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    Re: Dog question

    I have my own beagle and I also volunteer w/ a local beagle rescue, for which I am fostering my 4th beagle with the group. A puggle, as you mentioned, is part beagle. That "part" is showing its side. I can tell you this - there is nothing you can do other than remove the dog from the room when you're feeding the kid. Beagles will literally take food out of a humans' mouth if they had the opportunity. Kids are just easy targets for a quick snack.

    We crate-train our dogs. When we are out of the house, sleeping, or need the dogs out of the way, we just put them in the crate. Maybe it is worth getting/using a crate when you're feeding your little one. Beagles are EXTREMELY food driven. This is good for teaching them to do tricks. This is bad if you want a dog that's well behaved around food. I'm sorry to say, but you're stuck with the breed characteristics.

    If you want to learn more about beagle characteristics, and some potential training tips, stop by your local pet store, book store, or library and pick up a book on beagles. They are very different from the run-of-the-mill dog and it would do you well to know how they're different.

    Hope that helped!



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    Re: Dog question

    I agree 100% with colby here. I had a beagle growing up and we rescued a puggle that is very beagle-like as well. With both those dogs, I could get them to do almost anything if they knew they were getting a treat. Crate training only took a couple of weeks because we reinforced with treats. He went from being a dog that tried to run around and do whatever he could to avoid going in, to going in on command (with a treat given for going in, and a treat given for letting me close the door, and a treat given for staying quiet)... It's a frustrating week or two, then easy.

    Another thing to try is giving her a kong that has some tasty treats in it, and giving it to her when your kid is eating. The human food may overpower the dog treat, but it's something worth trying... We don't have kids, but if we did, I think I would try to give something to the dog to occupy them during that time first.

    I'm very anti shock-collar... especially for a puggle. Both beagles and pugs are very affectionate but also very sensitive dogs to that get pretty phased with anger and negative reinforcement. These dogs respond better to alternatives and positive reinforcement.



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    Re: Dog question

    Quote Originally Posted by cycloneSOULja View Post
    Another thing to try is giving her a kong that has some tasty treats in it, and giving it to her when your kid is eating. The human food may overpower the dog treat, but it's something worth trying... We don't have kids, but if we did, I think I would try to give something to the dog to occupy them during that time first.

    I'm very anti shock-collar... especially for a puggle. Both beagles and pugs are very affectionate but also very sensitive dogs to that get pretty phased with anger and negative reinforcement. These dogs respond better to alternatives and positive reinforcement.
    A Kong is a good idea. They're pretty cheap and can keep a dog distracted for quite a while. You can buy a can of Kong filler (looks like spray cheese) or perfectly-sized, hard treats to go in the Kong. The dog then has to work to get the stuff out. A cheaper way to go is to use the cheapest peanut butter you can buy. Also, freezing the kong with the stuff inside it will make it last a lot longer and keep the dog distracted longer. We actually used frozen kongs to get our dogs into the crates.

    A shock collar is a bad idea for a beagle. It might work for Labradors. It won't for beagles. They're hot-wired to be tracking food (rabbits, etc.) all of the time. A shock collar would just confuse them.



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    Re: Dog question

    I would just put the dog in the kennel. Much easier, and less frustrating. From what I understand Beagles are very food motivated. Probably can't help himself.


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    Re: Dog question

    Don't allow the dog in the kitchen if you can help it, in fact don't let them near you when anyone is eating. You could crate like many have suggested, or just have some sort of "place" command so that the dog knows that you and your family are off limits while eating. There isn't much more of an annoying trait than a begging or food snatching dog so I wish you luck.



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    Re: Dog question

    I've got the other half of the breed... two pugs. They're also very food motivated. We've trained ours fairly well, but we still have problems with them doing the exact thing you're describing on occasion. We used the kennel method and it worked well for us.



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    Re: Dog question

    Yeah, remove the dog from the area at feeding time. My beagle's brain is absolutely hard wired to her nose, and she can't help herself. We do have her trained now, but when she was younger, and my son was younger, she saw him as an easy mark, and got more than one pop tart out of the bargain.



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    Re: Dog question

    My beagle is 9 years old and just today I found him standing on the table eating crackers. Crazy beagle is just to wired for food. Vet always said you will either love him or hate them, no in between with a beagle.



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    Re: Dog question

    Leaving a beagle unattended around food is like leaving Charlie Sheen unattended around your wife.



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