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    Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Got a 12 year-old cocker spaniel who's had two bouts of pancreatitis in the past year. The first time he got over it we gradually weened him back onto his regular food, but after he got it the second time we thought we'd better try one of these prescription diets.

    I've read conflicting info about what we should feed him. He needs a low fat diet but some also say high fiber.

    My vet suggested two different foods:

    1. Royal Canin GI Low Fat (5% fat, 3.6% fiber)
    2. Science Diet Low Fat, GI, Diabetic (8.7% fat, 16% crude fiber, 28% insoluble fiber)

    Why such big differences in foods that are indicated for the same problem? I'm very confused. Recommendations?



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    I'll forward this on to my brother in law and see what he says.


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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    I am not a vet.

    I however have strong opinion about these costly "prescription diets." Yes they are formulated to meet certain percentages, but frequently use really crappy ingredients for your dog like brewer's rice and corn.

    What I would do is switch your dog to something that has better source ingredients. I'm not sure where you are at, but there are some really good dog foods at Brekke's or Theisen in Ames at reasonable expense. Look for dog foods that don't have corn, sugar or brewer's rice. Also make sure that the meat and fat sources are clearly labeled.

    After you have settled on a quality dog food, I would add things like sweet potato, apples and green beans to the kibble to boost the fiber amounts. Dogs enjoy these additions and it should increase the amount of fiber in their diet without throwing a lot of low quality waste grains in to their diet.



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by Broodwich View Post
    I am not a vet.

    I however have strong opinion about these costly "prescription diets." Yes they are formulated to meet certain percentages, but frequently use really crappy ingredients for your dog like brewer's rice and corn.

    What I would do is switch your dog to something that has better source ingredients. I'm not sure where you are at, but there are some really good dog foods at Brekke's or Theisen in Ames at reasonable expense. Look for dog foods that don't have corn, sugar or brewer's rice. Also make sure that the meat and fat sources are clearly labeled.

    After you have settled on a quality dog food, I would add things like sweet potato, apples and green beans to the kibble to boost the fiber amounts. Dogs enjoy these additions and it should increase the amount of fiber in their diet without throwing a lot of low quality waste grains in to their diet.
    Wow....by chance, are you staying at a Holiday Inn Express?


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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by ruxCYtable View Post
    Got a 12 year-old cocker spaniel who's had two bouts of pancreatitis in the past year. The first time he got over it we gradually weened him back onto his regular food, but after he got it the second time we thought we'd better try one of these prescription diets.

    I've read conflicting info about what we should feed him. He needs a low fat diet but some also say high fiber.

    My vet suggested two different foods:

    1. Royal Canin GI Low Fat (5% fat, 3.6% fiber)
    2. Science Diet Low Fat, GI, Diabetic (8.7% fat, 16% crude fiber, 28% insoluble fiber)

    Why such big differences in foods that are indicated for the same problem? I'm very confused. Recommendations?
    The biggest thing is to have a low fat diet. Higher fats are what set off the pancreatitis. Most low fat diets have higher fiber but that isn't as important as the amount of fat in the diet. I like Science diet R/d for chronic pancreatitis dogs.

    Link for more info on pancreatitis:

    02 Canine Pancreatitis - VeterinaryPartner.com - a VIN company!



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    My dog has had pancreatitis twice in the last year or so as well. After the second time I switch to Purina one Lamb and Rice mixture which is a low fat food. My dog loves it, and we have not had a repeat of it now in almost a year.



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by Broodwich View Post
    I am not a vet.

    I however have strong opinion about these costly "prescription diets." Yes they are formulated to meet certain percentages, but frequently use really crappy ingredients for your dog like brewer's rice and corn.

    What I would do is switch your dog to something that has better source ingredients. I'm not sure where you are at, but there are some really good dog foods at Brekke's or Theisen in Ames at reasonable expense. Look for dog foods that don't have corn, sugar or brewer's rice. Also make sure that the meat and fat sources are clearly labeled.

    After you have settled on a quality dog food, I would add things like sweet potato, apples and green beans to the kibble to boost the fiber amounts. Dogs enjoy these additions and it should increase the amount of fiber in their diet without throwing a lot of low quality waste grains in to their diet.

    Are you an animal nutritionist?



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by cytech View Post
    My dog has had pancreatitis twice in the last year or so as well. After the second time I switch to Purina one Lamb and Rice mixture which is a low fat food. My dog loves it, and we have not had a repeat of it now in almost a year.
    I just looked that up online. It has 16% fat, which is way too much for a dog with recurring pancreatitis. 5% or less is recommended.



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by ruxCYtable View Post
    I just looked that up online. It has 16% fat, which is way too much for a dog with recurring pancreatitis. 5% or less is recommended.
    Well the fact still remains that she had pancreatitis twice in 3 months than we switched to that food and have not had it since. I also stopped giving her pig ears, but that was after the first time.



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by Broodwich View Post
    I am not a vet.

    I however have strong opinion about these costly "prescription diets." Yes they are formulated to meet certain percentages, but frequently use really crappy ingredients for your dog like brewer's rice and corn.

    What I would do is switch your dog to something that has better source ingredients. I'm not sure where you are at, but there are some really good dog foods at Brekke's or Theisen in Ames at reasonable expense. Look for dog foods that don't have corn, sugar or brewer's rice. Also make sure that the meat and fat sources are clearly labeled.

    After you have settled on a quality dog food, I would add things like sweet potato, apples and green beans to the kibble to boost the fiber amounts. Dogs enjoy these additions and it should increase the amount of fiber in their diet without throwing a lot of low quality waste grains in to their diet.
    Based on discussions with my wife, who is a veterinarian, I would disagree. It is absolutely fine for dog foods to contain grains, especially corn. Companies like Hills, (Science Diet) Purina, (Purina One) and Proctor & Gamble (Iams & Eukaneuba) do a significant amount of research into dietary health. The higher end products they produce are likely to be healthier than a diet someone tries to put together themselves. We feed our pets either Purina One (dog) or Science Diet (cat).

    There is a movement, primarily by people who have no idea what they are talking about, towards what is commonly termed a "BARF diet." Google it if you are curious. I will simply say that that is a bad idea.

    There are also some foods (e.g. Blue Buffalo) that are trying to market their foods as better because they consist primarily of protein based ingredients (meat). Such claims are not supported by research.

    It should also be noted that pets can develop allergies over time. For this reason, it makes sense to feed a dog a consistent diet with more limited ingredients. This way the dog can be switched to a food with different ingredients if allergies develop. Some foods throw in so many different ingredients, including protein sources, that there may not be anything to switch to if a dog develops allergies.

    With regard to the poster's original question, I have no idea.


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  11. #11
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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by cytech View Post
    Well the fact still remains that she had pancreatitis twice in 3 months than we switched to that food and have not had it since. I also stopped giving her pig ears, but that was after the first time.
    Each dog is different. Some with pancreatitis will do ok with a 15 percent fat diet and some need around 5 percent.



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    Based on discussions with my wife, who is a veterinarian, I would disagree. It is absolutely fine for dog foods to contain grains, especially corn. Companies like Hills, (Science Diet) Purina, (Purina One) and Proctor & Gamble (Iams & Eukaneuba) do a significant amount of research into dietary health. The higher end products they produce are likely to be healthier than a diet someone tries to put together themselves. We feed our pets either Purina One (dog) or Science Diet (cat).

    There is a movement, primarily by people who have no idea what they are talking about, towards what is commonly termed a "BARF diet." Google it if you are curious. I will simply say that that is a bad idea.

    There are also some foods (e.g. Blue Buffalo) that are trying to market their foods as better because they consist primarily of protein based ingredients (meat). Such claims are not supported by research.

    It should also be noted that pets can develop allergies over time. For this reason, it makes sense to feed a dog a consistent diet with more limited ingredients. This way the dog can be switched to a food with different ingredients if allergies develop. Some foods throw in so many different ingredients, including protein sources, that there may not be anything to switch to if a dog develops allergies.

    With regard to the poster's original question, I have no idea.
    Bingo! I agree. I am a vet and am always hearing from clients about how bad corn and "fillers" are for dogs. There are some dogs that are allergic or have an intolerance to corn but that doesn't mean it is bad.



  13. #13
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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by Broodwich View Post
    I am not a vet.

    I however have strong opinion about these costly "prescription diets." Yes they are formulated to meet certain percentages, but frequently use really crappy ingredients for your dog like brewer's rice and corn.

    What I would do is switch your dog to something that has better source ingredients. I'm not sure where you are at, but there are some really good dog foods at Brekke's or Theisen in Ames at reasonable expense. Look for dog foods that don't have corn, sugar or brewer's rice. Also make sure that the meat and fat sources are clearly labeled.

    After you have settled on a quality dog food, I would add things like sweet potato, apples and green beans to the kibble to boost the fiber amounts. Dogs enjoy these additions and it should increase the amount of fiber in their diet without throwing a lot of low quality waste grains in to their diet.
    I am a vet,

    Everyone is entitled to there opinions, however, to give them when a serious medical condition is present is both ignorant and in of no benefit to this individual.

    Now back to the original question. There is no simple answer. We usually recommend looking at the current and previous diet, and see what the dietary fat intake has been. Some cases are associated with eating human food (dietary intolerance), getting into the garbage (dietary indiscretion), etc. and after resolution a low-fat diet may not be necessary. In the short run, I prefer something along the lines of 15-20% fat (ME basis) which includes Royal Canin Digestive Low Fat LF other choices include Hills r/d and w/d. Some dogs need less than this (might have hyperlipidemia or other complications) and need to restrict fat to 12-15%. Others might do fine up to 25% or even 30%. The type of fat matters as well - supplements such as fish oil or diets with added fish meal are less likely to be a concern than those with animal fat. It should be noted that many times patients have concurrent medical issues that include skin allergies, metabolic conditions, urinary issues, etc that make this diet choosing alot more difficult. Therefore, it is always a good idea to consult your veterinarian, as these can be quite complicated.

    Please feel free to PM if you have any additional questions.

    Sincerely,
    CloneSolo



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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by linkshero View Post
    Wow....by chance, are you staying at a Holiday Inn Express?
    It sounds good. Spice up with your own good inmgredients.


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  15. #15
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    Re: Any vets here? Q re: prescription dog food

    Quote Originally Posted by CloneSolo View Post
    I am a vet,

    Everyone is entitled to there opinions, however, to give them when a serious medical condition is present is both ignorant and in of no benefit to this individual.

    Now back to the original question. There is no simple answer. We usually recommend looking at the current and previous diet, and see what the dietary fat intake has been. Some cases are associated with eating human food (dietary intolerance), getting into the garbage (dietary indiscretion), etc. and after resolution a low-fat diet may not be necessary. In the short run, I prefer something along the lines of 15-20% fat (ME basis) which includes Royal Canin Digestive Low Fat LF other choices include Hills r/d and w/d. Some dogs need less than this (might have hyperlipidemia or other complications) and need to restrict fat to 12-15%. Others might do fine up to 25% or even 30%. The type of fat matters as well - supplements such as fish oil or diets with added fish meal are less likely to be a concern than those with animal fat. It should be noted that many times patients have concurrent medical issues that include skin allergies, metabolic conditions, urinary issues, etc that make this diet choosing alot more difficult. Therefore, it is always a good idea to consult your veterinarian, as these can be quite complicated.

    Please feel free to PM if you have any additional questions.

    Sincerely,
    CloneSolo
    I have a quick question for you, somewhat related, what is your feeling on this type of information? I have a lot of respect for our vet, however I think the financial incentive to sell these types of kibbles means we may not always get the "best" information.
    Dog Food Reviews - Main Index - Powered by ReviewPost

    Just curious, like I said I respect our vet and she is great with our choice to feed Orijen/Acana


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